2,094Grants to

1,371(Sub)Species

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The Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund has awarded 743 grants for this species type, constituting a total donation of $7,588,396.

Mammal Conservation Case Studies

Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 10251084) - Lesser long-nosed bat - Awarded $5,000 on October 12, 2010
12-10-2010 - Lesser long-nosed bat

Creating a long-term conservation strategy for lesser long-nosed bats throughout Mexico and the US requires: increasing our knowledge of lesser long-nosed bat populations and migration; species conservation training biologists, managers and students; monitoring roosts; and incorporating “citizen scientist” observations. We seek a better understanding of population status and trends as well as the dynamics of migratory corridors and factors ...

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 10251570) - Brown howler monkeys - Awarded $5,000 on October 12, 2010
12-10-2010 - Brown howler monkeys

This project is aimed at assessing the current population status and the main threats affecting a small and poorly known population of brown howler monkeys in the Atlantic Forest of Northeastern Argentina, after a yellow fever epidemics occurred in 2008-2009. The information gathered will be used to develop an effective conservation strategy for the species in this region.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 10251571) - Saiga antelope - Awarded $15,000 on October 12, 2010
12-10-2010 - Saiga antelope

The project builds capacity for saiga conservation throughout its range, through supporting 3 activites: a) Participatory monitoring of saigas by local farmers in the North-West Pre-Caspian Region of Russia; b) Publication of a biannual bulletin, Saiga News, in 6 languages, online and in hard copy; c) a Small Grants programme to support grassroots conservation action by range state nationals.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 10251554) - Black-and-white colobus monkey  - Awarded $24,997 on October 03, 2010
03-10-2010 - Black-and-white colobus monkey

A population of black-and-white colobus occurs between the Sassandra and the Bandama Rivers in Côte d’Ivoire, the taxonomic status of which is not yet clear. We conducted an extensive survey within this area and found that only one population has survived in a forest grove. This population has a similar coat pattern like Colobus vellerosus, however vocalization data failed to firmly confirm this affinity.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 10251120) - Delacour's langur - Awarded $20,500 on September 30, 2010
30-09-2010 - Delacour's langur

The Delacour’s langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) a Critically Endangered and Vietnamese endemic primate counts only 200 individuals in 9 isolated subpopulations. Captive bred individuals from the Endangered Primate Rescue Center were released into Van Long Nature Reserve to stabilize the only viable population and to increase the genetic diversity. The project receives active support from surrounding communes of the reserve.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 0925431) - Vancouver Island marmot - Awarded $10,000 on September 30, 2010
30-09-2010 - Vancouver Island marmot

The Vancouver Island marmot is a critically endangered ground squirrel endemic to British Columbia, Canada. By 1998, the species consisted of fewer than 100 individuals. Between 2003 and 2010, captive-bred marmots were released to the wild and their locations and survival rates monitored. My research examines release sites to identify characteristics that increased the likelihood of these marmots surviving their first year in the wild.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 0925793) - Southern-central black rhino - Awarded $15,000 on September 30, 2010
30-09-2010 - Southern-central black rhino

This project was to purchase a new 4WD vehicle for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, a joint project of the Zambia Wildlife Authority and the Frankfurt Zoological Society. Black rhinos have been reintroduced to North Luangwa National Park in four phases from 2003-2010, and the ongoing task is to monitor and protect this population. Vehicle support for patrols is essential.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 0925660) - Red-capped Mangabey - Awarded $15,000 on September 30, 2010
30-09-2010 - Red-capped Mangabey

The Red-capped mangabey is a strikingly attractive primate found from Nigeria to Gabon. It is Vulnerable, and under most threat in Nigeria where the vast human population is placing increasing pressure through demand for bushmeat and timber. CERCOPAN's operation is reducing both hunting and logging in community forests in SE Nigeria, with plans for reintroduction of the species into protected forest.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 0905724) - Black rhino - Awarded $10,000 on September 30, 2010
30-09-2010 - Black rhino

Yearly percentage of females calving is the best fitting function of Plant Available Nutrient (PAN) and Moisture (PAM) in predicting black rhino population performance. Low PAN, high PAM areas yield maximum reproductive returns while high PAN, high PAM areas yield the converse for black rhino. This study contributes to selection criteria for areas that yield maximum reproductive returns for black rhinos insitu.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 10251371) - Barbary Macaque - Awarded $10,000 on July 15, 2010
15-07-2010 - Barbary Macaque

This cross-disciplinary conservation project focuses on the Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus) as a flagship species for the threatened flora, fauna and fungi of the unique and diverse ecosystems of northern Morocco. The project works with local people to gather scientific data and raise their awareness so they can work to safeguard the species, its habitats, and their own livelihoods.

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