1,558Grants to

1,062(Sub)Species

MBZ Blog

In Sept ’16…another $500k for conservation

For the 2nd round of grants in 2016, the Fund distributed more than $500k in support of the world’s most endangered species. This is the second of 3 rounds of funding planned for 2016.

The Fund supported 51 more conservation projects with $508,340 bringing the total amount donated to species conservation to $14,485,278 in 7 years. Here is a short sample of the 50+ projects in the latest round of grant giving.

$12,500 for the first comprehensive bat survey in 50 years in the United Arab Emirates.
$32,550 for small wildcats across Asia;
Three special awards for full funding up to $25,000 to Hawaiian birds, African Crocs, and Indian sea cucumbers
$15,000 for African zebrawood in Cameroon;
$25,975 for turtles across in Africa and North America;

Many of the grant recipients have created case studies on our website and you can view these by navigating to the case study section of our website. If you are interested in apply for a grant, please visit our grant application page and apply before our next deadline.

One window closes, another opens

We have an open door policy. Conservationists seeking grants are welcome to knock anytime – day or night. To be more specific, each year the Fund opens three windows (or doors) and as one closes, another opens.

The deadlines for grant proposals come at the end of February, end of June and end of October.

During each of these three periods we receive hundreds of applications from species conservationists.

Our advisory board, then, reviews the applications – making decisions to support some and reject others. Our advisory board is efficient, effective and decisive.

For those grant applications received before the end of February, the Fund will announce its decisions before the end of May. For those grant applications received by the end of June, grant recipients are informed in September. For those received before October’s end, awards will be made by the end of the year.

The Fund looks forward to reading through your applications and funding exciting projects throughout the year.

MBZ Fund issues Annual Report

The Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund is issuing its Annual Report today.

Whether it’s searching for a rare dragonfly along the eastern coast of the UAE or trekking the Himalayas to MBZ Cover Englishdocument the existence of a small wildcat, the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund continues to support individuals in the villages, field stations, laboratories and homes, who are committed to conserving their local (and the world’s global) threatened species.

The Fund supported 185 species conservation projects in more than 70 countries with more than $1.55 million in 2014. These funds were distributed globally among conservation projects to some of the most endangered species including fish, mammals, plants, reptiles and even fungi.

The annual report is available for download here: http://www.speciesconservation.org/media-center/downloads

 

Advisory board member, Mike Parr, highlights Fund support for Black-capped petrel conservation

(cc) Ryan Trachtenberg

(cc) Ryan Trachtenberg

A terrific example of how several small grants can cumulatively further the conservation of a species can be found in the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund’s support for the Endangered Black-capped petrel. Answering the questions of where this species nests and forages are key to identifying conservation actions needed to conserve this declining species. However, until recently, because of the Black-capped petrel’s nocturnal behavior and small population size, little was known. Read more…

What are species doing for us? “Plenty!” answers the advisory board of the Abu Dhabi-based Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund

320px-The_Indian_Vulture_(Gyps_indicus)_or_Long-billed_Vulture

(cc) Deepak Sankat

Abu Dhabi, UAE: The potential for advances in anti-fouling and adhesion technology derived from the study of clam-like Blue mussels may result in massive fuel savings to marine vessels and advances in adhesives with medical applications. Fiddler crabs, common in salt marshes and mangrove forests throughout the world, help mangrove trees grow larger, taller and thicker which in turn helps sequester more carbon. Read more…

One window closes, another opens

On 1-Nov, the Fund closed its last grant application window of 2014. We received more than 450 applications, 458 to be exact. These applications were submitted to the Fund between 1 July and 31 October 2014.

The applications will be reviewed by our advisory board and decisions will be made before the end of 2014. Of course, not all applications will be funded. For the final round of funding in 2014; more than $500k will be awarded.

By the end of 2014 the Fund will have donated another $1.5m to species conservation, bringing the total awarded to nearly $12m.

Dont be alarmed, there is another funding window currently wide open. The next deadline 28-Feb-15.

In Sept ’14…another $500k for conservation

The Fund supported 57 more conservation projects with $514,495 bringing the total amount donated to species conservation to $11,380, 859 in less 5 years. Here is a short sample of the 61 projects in the latest round of grant giving.

  •  $4,600 emergency population assessment grant for giraffe in Congo;
  •  $2,500 for Sociable lapwing in Eritrea;
  •  $9,500 for wild coffee plant in Tanzania;
  • $6,500 for Rusty spotted cat in Sri Lanka;
  • $15,670 for the Christmas Island giant gecko in Austrailia.

Many of the grant recipients have created case studies on our website and you can view these by navigating to the case study section of our website. If you are interested in apply for a grant, please visit our grant application page and apply before our next deadline.

MBZ Fund publishes 2013 Annual Report

Hot off the presses, the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund is issuing its 2013 Annual Report. The report is available for download in English and Arabic as a high resolution pdf. See the links at the end of this post. Other formats will be made available shortly.

In 2013 more than $1,600,000 was awarded to species conservation in more than 83 countries world-wide. Since inception in 2008 the Fund has contributed almost $11m 1,080 projects across the world.

The report’s 100 pages highlight the work of conservationists who received financial support from the Fund in 2013. The annual report highlights projects from all species types including the Anatolian Viper, Baluchistan black bear, Australian lungfish, Juan Fernandez diving beetle, Large bellflower,  Tooth-billed pigeon and Harlequin frog.

Please take the time to download the report (6 MBs). You can request a hard copy of the report by sending at email to media (AT) mbzspeciesconservation.org

Happy Reading!

 

To download the Arabic Version Click Here:  MbZSCF_AR 2013_ARABIC weboptimized

For download the English Version Click Here: MbZSCF_AR2014_ENGLSH weboptimized

SWCCA contributes $3,160 toward two projects

The Small Wild Cat Conservation Alliance (SWCCA) generously contributed $3,160 toward two projects that were recently supported by the Fund. Together both organizations were able contribute more than $28,160 to wild cat conservation during this round of grant giving.

This is the second time SWCCA and the Fund have combined finances to ensure strong support for wild cat conservation, when in December 2013 SWCCA and the Fund donated $33,000 to small wild cat conservation.

The Fund would like to express its deep appreciation to the SWCCA for its continued commitment and tireless efforts on behalf of wild cat conservation globally.

For more information about the Small Wild Cat Conservation Alliance, please visit their website.

Fund gives another $500k to Species Conservation

The Fund supported 61 more conservation projects with $508,875 bringing the total amount donated to species conservation to $10,866, 366 in less than 5 years. Here is a short sample of the 61 projects in the latest round of grant giving.

  •  $12,000 to build a conservation learning center for black rhino in Zambia;
  •  $20,000 to assess the conservation status of fungi in Egypt;
  •  $12,000 to assess the distribution of a critically endangered dragonfly in the mountains of UAE and Oman;
  •  Two Fishing cat projects, one in Nepal and the other in India, with more than $20,000;
  • $12,000 to investigate the breeding grounds of the Townsend´s Shearwater on three islands off Mexico’s Pacific coast.

Many of the grant recipients have created case studies on our website and you can view these by navigating to the case study section of our website. If you are interested in apply for a grant, please visit our grant application page and apply before our next deadline.