1,676Grants to

1,132(Sub)Species

MBZ Blog

Great knot: From Russia to UAE and back again

While on a bird watching trip to Umm Al Quwain in the north of the United Arab Emirates, a teacher at the British School Al Kubairat in Abu Dhabi spotted an Endangered wading bird with a leg band marked ‘E1’. After further investigation, it was discovered that the bird, a Great knot, had been ringed an astonishing 13,000 miles away by a scientist in Russia.

As it turned out, that scientist was none other than Dmitry Dorofeev, one of the MBZ Fund’s 2016 grant recipients who had conducted field work in the Kamchatka Peninsula. Specifically, Dmitry was investigating Khairusovo–Belogolovaya estuary, on the Western coast of Kamchatka, as a key location for protected wader species on the East Asian–Australasian migratory flyway.

During his fieldwork in the summer of 2016, Dmitry had ringed several wading bird species including many Great knots. It was thought that these birds migrated to Australia. It certainly was not expected to be spotted in the UAE.

But, it was and it’s the first documented case of the Great knot migrating from Russia to the UAE.

In another interesting turn in the great knot story, the bird with the leg band marked ‘E1’ was spotted again by Dmitry during his annual fieldwork in 2017. We will be searching for the bird during spring 2017 in Umm Al Quwain.

In the meantime, please have a look at our case study on the project, as well as a short film about the twists and turns of the Great Knot:

In Sept ’17…another $500k for conservation

For the 2nd round of grants in 2017, the Fund distributed more than $500k in support of the world’s most endangered species. This is the second of 3 rounds of funding planned for 2017.

The Fund supported 58 more conservation projects with $500,003 bringing the total amount donated to species conservation to $ 15,992,639 in 9 years. Here is a short sample of the 50+ projects in the latest round of grant giving.

$7,100 for to secure wildlife corridors for the Bengal tiger in Bhutan;

$9,532 for the Northern tiger cat in Brazil;

$3,500 for bumble bee research in remote areas of Nepal.

Two special awards for full funding up to $25,000 were granted to the (1) Geometric tortoise in South Africa and to the (2) Variable harlequin frog in Panama.

Many of the grant recipients have created case studies on our website and you can view these by navigating to the case study section of our website. If you are interested in applying for a grant, please visit our grant application page to apply for a grant before our next deadline.

MBZ Fund issues 2016 Annual Report

The Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund is issuing its 2016 Annual Report today.

Whether it’s surveying fungi in Far Eastern Russia or working with local communities and wildlife rangers to reduce elephant-human conflict in India the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund continues to support individuals in the villages, field stations, laboratories and homes, who are committed to conserving their local (and the world’s global) threatened species.

The Fund supported 172 species conservation projects in 69 countries with more than $1.52 million in 2016. These funds were distributed globally among conservation projects to some of the most endangered species including fish, mammals, plants, reptiles and even fungi.

The annual report is available for download here: http://www.speciesconservation.org/media-center/downloads

In Sept ’16…another $500k for conservation

For the 2nd round of grants in 2016, the Fund distributed more than $500k in support of the world’s most endangered species. This is the second of 3 rounds of funding planned for 2016.

The Fund supported 51 more conservation projects with $508,340 bringing the total amount donated to species conservation to $14,485,278 in 7 years. Here is a short sample of the 50+ projects in the latest round of grant giving.

$12,500 for the first comprehensive bat survey in 50 years in the United Arab Emirates.
$32,550 for small wildcats across Asia;
Three special awards for full funding up to $25,000 to Hawaiian birds, African Crocs, and Indian sea cucumbers
$15,000 for African zebrawood in Cameroon;
$25,975 for turtles across in Africa and North America;

Many of the grant recipients have created case studies on our website and you can view these by navigating to the case study section of our website. If you are interested in apply for a grant, please visit our grant application page and apply before our next deadline.

One window closes, another opens

We have an open door policy. Conservationists seeking grants are welcome to knock anytime – day or night. To be more specific, each year the Fund opens three windows (or doors) and as one closes, another opens.

The deadlines for grant proposals come at the end of February, end of June and end of October.

During each of these three periods we receive hundreds of applications from species conservationists.

Our advisory board, then, reviews the applications – making decisions to support some and reject others. Our advisory board is efficient, effective and decisive.

For those grant applications received before the end of February, the Fund will announce its decisions before the end of May. For those grant applications received by the end of June, grant recipients are informed in September. For those received before October’s end, awards will be made by the end of the year.

The Fund looks forward to reading through your applications and funding exciting projects throughout the year.

MBZ Fund issues Annual Report

The Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund is issuing its Annual Report today.

Whether it’s searching for a rare dragonfly along the eastern coast of the UAE or trekking the Himalayas to MBZ Cover Englishdocument the existence of a small wildcat, the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund continues to support individuals in the villages, field stations, laboratories and homes, who are committed to conserving their local (and the world’s global) threatened species.

The Fund supported 185 species conservation projects in more than 70 countries with more than $1.55 million in 2014. These funds were distributed globally among conservation projects to some of the most endangered species including fish, mammals, plants, reptiles and even fungi.

The annual report is available for download here: http://www.speciesconservation.org/media-center/downloads

 

Advisory board member, Mike Parr, highlights Fund support for Black-capped petrel conservation

(cc) Ryan Trachtenberg

(cc) Ryan Trachtenberg

A terrific example of how several small grants can cumulatively further the conservation of a species can be found in the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund’s support for the Endangered Black-capped petrel. Answering the questions of where this species nests and forages are key to identifying conservation actions needed to conserve this declining species. However, until recently, because of the Black-capped petrel’s nocturnal behavior and small population size, little was known. Read more…

What are species doing for us? “Plenty!” answers the advisory board of the Abu Dhabi-based Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund

320px-The_Indian_Vulture_(Gyps_indicus)_or_Long-billed_Vulture

(cc) Deepak Sankat

Abu Dhabi, UAE: The potential for advances in anti-fouling and adhesion technology derived from the study of clam-like Blue mussels may result in massive fuel savings to marine vessels and advances in adhesives with medical applications. Fiddler crabs, common in salt marshes and mangrove forests throughout the world, help mangrove trees grow larger, taller and thicker which in turn helps sequester more carbon. Read more…

One window closes, another opens

On 1-Nov, the Fund closed its last grant application window of 2014. We received more than 450 applications, 458 to be exact. These applications were submitted to the Fund between 1 July and 31 October 2014.

The applications will be reviewed by our advisory board and decisions will be made before the end of 2014. Of course, not all applications will be funded. For the final round of funding in 2014; more than $500k will be awarded.

By the end of 2014 the Fund will have donated another $1.5m to species conservation, bringing the total awarded to nearly $12m.

Dont be alarmed, there is another funding window currently wide open. The next deadline 28-Feb-15.

In Sept ’14…another $500k for conservation

The Fund supported 57 more conservation projects with $514,495 bringing the total amount donated to species conservation to $11,380, 859 in less 5 years. Here is a short sample of the 61 projects in the latest round of grant giving.

  •  $4,600 emergency population assessment grant for giraffe in Congo;
  •  $2,500 for Sociable lapwing in Eritrea;
  •  $9,500 for wild coffee plant in Tanzania;
  • $6,500 for Rusty spotted cat in Sri Lanka;
  • $15,670 for the Christmas Island giant gecko in Austrailia.

Many of the grant recipients have created case studies on our website and you can view these by navigating to the case study section of our website. If you are interested in apply for a grant, please visit our grant application page and apply before our next deadline.