1,924Grants to

1,262(Sub)Species

The Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund has awarded 138 grants for this species type, constituting a total donation of $998,371.

Invertebrate Conservation Case Studies

Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 12054710) - Staghorn coral - Awarded $4,000 on December 20, 2012
20-12-2012 - Staghorn coral

My research focuses on taking a metabolic and physiological approach to find markers for resilience to climate change stress in the critically endangered coral, Acropora cervicornis. Specifically I am looking at tissue lipids and carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes to determine how energy is allocated under stress in this species in order to have a better understanding of how to conserve it.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 12054688) - Clark's Crayfish - Awarded $8,000 on December 20, 2012
20-12-2012 - Clark's Crayfish

The Australian Crayfish project was established with the aim of addressing specific knowledge gaps on all Australian crayfishes. With the assistance of the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund we are researching a unique small freshwater crayfish Euastacus clarkae that is only known to occur in a small highland section of Australia’s world heritage listed, Gowandan Rainforest.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 12054292) - Kauri Redcoat Damselfly - Awarded $2,000 on September 20, 2012
20-09-2012 - Kauri Redcoat Damselfly

Kauri Redcoat Damselfly (Xanthocnemis sobrina) is endemic to the New Zealand North Island. It is the only representative of its group in the country that is assessed as Data Deficient after the most recent IUCN Red List evaluation. The assessment was based on uncertainties around the species taxonomy and current conservation status.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 12254384) - Bumble bees - Awarded $6,000 on September 20, 2012
20-09-2012 - Bumble bees

Pollinators are critical components of our environment and essential to our food security, contributing to one in three bites of food that we eat. Bumble bees are among the best known pollinators, yet their conservation status remains largely unknown. We are evaluating the status of 43 species of North American bumble bees using the IUCN Red List Criteria.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 12254044) - Amani Flatwing - Awarded $8,000 on September 20, 2012
20-09-2012 - Amani Flatwing

The Amani Flatwing is one of the world's rarest dragonflies, threatened with extinction due to its restricted range and its small population in the Usambara Mts. To secure the species' survival on earth a workshop was jointly organized by Eustack Mtui from theTanzanian Forest Conservation Group (TFCG) and Dr. Viola Clausnitzer from Senckenberg, Germany.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 12054041) - Juan Fernandez diving beetle - Awarded $4,850 on September 20, 2012
20-09-2012 - Juan Fernandez diving beetle

Anisomeria bistriata is endemic to Juan Fernandez islands in the Pacific, off the Chilean coast. It has, to our knowledge, not been surveyed in over a century. Our goals therefore are: - Visit the islands to establish if the species still exists. If so: - Describe its adult and if possible larval habitat. - Assess to which degree the species faces anthropogenic threats.

View Juan Fernandez diving beetle project

Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 12253022) - Congregating fireflies - Awarded $10,000 on January 12, 2012
12-01-2012 - Congregating fireflies

Very little is known about the fireflies in the Kuala Selangor Nature Park (KSNP). The KSNP lake system is undergoing rehabilitation. These changes may have an impact on the fireflies. The firefly study and habitat mapping will aid in the Park management, where the fireflies can be a bio-indicator. A monitoring program and awareness materials will be developed. KSNP is a Congregating Firefly Zone (MBZSCF:0925338).

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 11052747) - Canterbury Knobbled Weevil - Awarded $4,000 on October 27, 2011
27-10-2011 - Canterbury Knobbled Weevil

The weevil, Hadramphus tuberculatus, is a critically endangered, endemic invertebrate that is found in the montane foothills of New Zealand. It was last sighted in 1922 and presumed extinct (Craw 1999) until its rediscovery in 2004 (Young 2006). In the IUCN database, the weevil is listed as extinct since the entry was created in 1996. It has only one known population.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 11252410) - The Terrible hairy fly - Awarded $12,000 on October 26, 2011
26-10-2011 - The Terrible hairy fly

Of the approximately 150,000 described species of flies, the "terrible hairy fly", Mormotomyia hirsuta, is considered to be the world's rarest, known from a single hill in eastern Kenya. Discovered in 1933 it was last seen in 1948 until rediscovered in late 2010. Our project aims to explore for other potential Mormotomyia sites and to study its biology and molecular genetics.

View The Terrible hairy fly project

Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 11252329) - Black-legged Burrowing Scorpion - Awarded $20,000 on October 26, 2011
26-10-2011 - Black-legged Burrowing Scorpion

The southern African burrowing scorpion genus Opistophthalmus includes the world’s most threatened scorpions. Five species endemic to the Western Cape Province of South Africa (Opistophthalmus fuscipes, O. intermedius, O. latro, O. leipoldti and O. capensis) are particularly at risk. This project aims to survey the known distributions of these scorpions, identify remaining wild populations, and collect samples from each for genetic analysis.

View Black-legged Burrowing Scorpion project