2,274Grants to

1,458(Sub)Species

Mohamed bin Zayed Species project number 14059810

Effects of habitat destruction on parental care behavior in the Critically Endangered San Martin titi monkey, Callicebus oenanthe

Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 14059810) - San Martin titi monkey - Awarded $5,000 on July 30, 2015

 

Habitat Destruction 

Level of habitat destruction was determined by habitat connectivity, fruit availability, and intensity of exposure to human activity for two study sites. Study site 1, located in the city of Calzada, was determined to exhibit a high level of habitat destruction. Study site 1 was 0.0217 square kilometers in area and possessed no areas of habitat connectivity (corridors or islands). This site possessed reduced availability of fruits (personal communication, Jaemy Romero Herrada), and experienced a high intensity of exposure to human activities (weekly exposure).    

 

Study site 2, located in the city of Yantaló, was determined to exhibit a moderate level of habitat destruction. Study site 2 was 0.0406 square kilometers in area and possessed two areas of habitat connectivity. This site possessed a high availability of fruits (personal communication, Jaemy Romero Herrada), and experienced a high intensity of exposure to human activities (weekly exposure).    

 

Parental Care 

Data on infant care (nursing, carrying, grooming, cleaning, inspecting, and playing) was collected from all group members for two San Martin titi monkey groups using instantaneous focal animal sampling. Group members were idenitified based on pelage coloring, facial markings, and size.     

 

Results 

Given the small sample size (1 site per level), caution should be used when interpreting results more broadly. Preliminary results may suggest that higher levels of habitat destruction lead to increased proportions of alloparental care, however further research is needed to rule out the possibility that outcomes are based on differences between the study groups.

 

Conservation Outreach 

To improve the conservation potential of this project, I collaborated with the Proyecto Mono Tocón, a locally-operated NGO based in Moyobamba, Peru. The Proyecto Mono Tocón provided assistants for this project and also hosted a forum where I could share and discuss my project results at the local level. In November 2015, I presented results to members of the municipal government of Calzada, Peru.   



Project 14059810 location - Peru, South America