1,869Grants to

1,236(Sub)Species

Africa

The Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund has awarded 512 grants constituting a total donation of $5,188,363 for species conservation projects based in Africa.

Conservation Case Studies in Africa

Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 14259098) - Largetooth sawfish - Awarded $9,000 on September 16, 2014
16-09-2014 - Largetooth sawfish

Sawfishes in Madagascar: Documenting and conserving critically endangered species in their last stronghold in African waters.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 14258733) - Ploughshare Tortoise - Awarded $11,000 on September 16, 2014
16-09-2014 - Ploughshare Tortoise

Strengthening Ploughshare Tortoise (Astrochelys yniphora) Protection and Local Economies in Baly Bay National Park, Madagascar

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 14059592) - African Penguin - Awarded $4,000 on September 16, 2014
16-09-2014 - African Penguin

Reduced prey availability is thought to be the largest factor driving the decline of the African Penguin. However, it remains unclear whether commercial fisheries affect the penguins by competing for food. This project will assess the impact of small-scale fishery closures and spatial restrictions on fishing. This will provide insights in to the penguin-fisheries relationship and the effectiveness of fisheries management as a conservation ...

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 14058782) - Northern Sportive Lemur - Awarded $5,000 on September 16, 2014
16-09-2014 - Northern Sportive Lemur

Madagascar: Citizen Scientists to save the Critically Endangered Northern Sportive Lemur, Lepilemur septentrionalis

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 14258950) - Bonobo - Awarded $12,500 on September 16, 2014
16-09-2014 - Bonobo

We have been working in close partnership with Congolese partners at Lilungu since 2005. Strengthening bonobo monitoring and protection programs and supporting the local community in gaining official legal protection for their forest will be a milestone for bonobo conservation. Anchoring protection at this strategically located site will link a critical corridor between key bonobo sites, helping to ensure long-term survival of bonobos.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 14258776) - Indri - Awarded $10,000 on April 30, 2014
30-04-2014 - Indri

The indri is the largest of the living lemurs, all endemic to Madagascar. It is considered amongst the 25 most endangered primates in the world, and as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. This community-based project run by The Aspinall Foundation helps protect one of the largest remaining lowland indri populations, living in the Andriantantely rainforest of eastern Madagascar.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 14258646) - Greater big-footed mouse - Awarded $5,000 on April 30, 2014
30-04-2014 - Greater big-footed mouse

We are looking for the conservation strategy appropriate to the greater big-footed mouse in the dry forest of Ankarafantsika National Park.This species is listed as endangered species because it's only found in Ankarafantsika National Park Madagascar and it is victim of pressures (human acivities, predator). So, it's important and urgent to adopt and apply a conservation strategy.

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 14058341) - Shimba Hills reed frog - Awarded $2,500 on April 29, 2014
29-04-2014 - Shimba Hills reed frog

ESTABLISHING THE POPULATION DYNAMICS AND ANTHROPOGENIC THREATS TO SHIMBA HILLS REED FROG ((Hyperolius rubrovermiculatus)

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Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation (Project No. 13257627) - West African chimpanzee - Awarded $12,500 on December 23, 2013
23-12-2013 - West African chimpanzee

Wild chimpanzees are only found in tropical Africa, where their populations have declined by more than 66% in the last 30 years.To assure the protection of chimpanzees, the WCF will continue its important programs.Conservation education is a priority long-term action for the conservation of chimpanzees and other wildlife. In 2007, WCF created nature clubs called “Club P.A.N.”(People, Animals & Nature) for schools in West Africa.

View West African chimpanzee project